Tag Archive | giveaways

A Regency Sister–My Interview with Regina Scott

I am so excited to be hosting Regina Scott on my blog today. Regina is one of my August 2013 Love Inspired Historical release sisters AND she writes Regency Inspy. So we’re publishing sisters and sisters of the same genre/era too. Of course, she carries more weight than I do, because she’s written 25 books and I have only written 3 so far.

Here’s more about Regina:

Author Regina Scott.

Author Regina Scott.

Regina Scott started writing novels in the third grade.  Thankfully for literature as we know it, she didn’t actually sell her first novel until she learned a bit more about writing.  Since her first book was published in 1998, her stories have traveled the globe, with translations in many languages including Dutch, German, Italian and Portuguese.  She and her husband of over 25 years reside in southeast Washington State with their overactive Irish terrier.  Regina Scott is a decent fencer, owns a historical costume collection that takes up over a third of her large closet and is an active member of the Church of the Nazarene.  You can find her online blogging atwww.nineteenteen.blogspot.com.  Learn more about her at www.reginascott.com or connect with her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authorreginascott.

Now, on to the interview!

LG: What “eras” are your favorite, and is there an era you haven’t written about that strikes your fancy?

RS: The Regency period is a long-time favorite.  So far, all 25 of my published books have been set in that era.  There’s something about the fine manners, the witty dialogue, and the influence of Society that appeals to the romantic in me.  However, I’ve wanted to write about pioneers in my own Pacific Northwest for a long time.  That’s why I’m thrilled that Love Inspired will be publishing a new series from me, beginning in early 2014, based on the real-life story of Civil War orphans and widows who came to Seattle to be brides for the frontier lumber barons and entrepreneurs.  Anyone remember the television series, Here Come the Brides?  This is the Love Inspired version. 🙂

LG: If you could only read one fiction author/book for the rest of your life, what would you choose?

RS: Oh, this is so difficult!  My first thought is Elizabeth Mansfield.  She is the author who introduced me to Regency romances.  I have reread her books so many times over the years!  But my “keeper” shelf is groaning, and it would be hard to leave any of those books behind.

LG: What was the biggest stumbling block you had to overcome with your writing career?

RS: Time.  When I first became serious about writing, I was a young mother with two preschoolers and a full-time job.  Writing was done in long-hand on park benches and on a computer late at night and early in the morning.  I still have trouble juggling other commitments, even now that the writing is closer to coming first.

LG: What is the biggest joy your career has brought you so far?

RS: Fan mail and blog comments.  I absolutely love hearing from readers who enjoyed my books.  Facebook and e-mail have made reaching out so much easier, but I’m still honored when a reader takes the time to let me know my words touched her heart.

I love hearing from fans, too. In fact, leave a blog comment on Regina’s guest blog, Lacy Williams’ blog, or mine from yesterday, and you will be entered to win an autographed bundle of the LIH August 2013 releases! US residents only, please.

And here’s a little bit about Regina’s August 2013 release, The Courting Campaign:

The Courting Campaign by Regina Scott.

The Courting Campaign by Regina Scott.

Emma Pyrmont has no designs on handsome Sir Nicholas Rotherford–at least not for herself.  As his daughter’s nanny, she sees how lonely little Alice has been.  With the cook’s help, Emma shows the workaholic scientist just what Alice needs.  But making Nicholas a better father makes Emma wish her painful past didn’t mar her own marriage chances.

Ever since scandal destroyed his career, Nicholas has devoted himself to his new invention.  Now his daughter’s sweet, quick-witted nanny is proving an unexpected distraction.  All evidence suggests that happiness is within reach–if only a man of logic can trust in the deductions of his own heart.

 

Release Day for Healing the Soldier’s Heart!

Yay, it’s finally here! Release day for Healing the Soldier’s Heart!

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As you know, this is my third and final installment of the Brides of Waterloo series. This book is all about Sophie’s best friend Lucy Williams, who works as a governess for Lord Bradbury’s two daughters. Lucy is one of those people who has lived by he wits all her life. She had to, for she was orphaned when she was very young. By sheer intelligence and determination, she has made a life for herself from nothing. And at the same time, she expects very little from life. After all, romance is for women of means. She cannot afford to dream.

Lucy meets Ensign James Rowland through Sophie and her fiance, Captain Cantrill. Rowland also served at Waterloo, and though he was not gravely injured in the battle, his soul is scarred forever. One moment of cowardice on the battlefield has cost him the gift of speech, and he struggles in a meaningless, friendless existence. His quick temper masks a man in torment. And only Lucy’s sweet, impulsive friendship can bring him out of his shell.

I really loved writing this book–maybe it’s that it’s the third in my series, but I felt I knew the characters so well. They became old, dear friends. You can join my Goodreads giveaway to get your own free copy, or comment below for a chance to win an autographed bundle of all the August 2013 LIH releases! US residents only, please.

An Interview with Love Inspired’s Lacy Williams

Hi everyone!

This week is Release Week for my third book in the Brides of Waterloo series, Healing the Soldier’s Heart. And if you’re familiar with the way Love Inspired releases books, then you know that every month a handful of new books get wings. I decided it would be fun to interview my fellow release authors for the month of August–get to know them better and then offer one lucky reader a chance to win all four August titles–and autographed to boot!

I’d like to kick things off by introducing Lacy Williams. Lacy sent me her bio, and it goes like this:

By day, Lacy Williams is a stay-at-home mom battling dirty diapers and dog-hair dust-bunnies. By night, she is an award-winning novelist. She loves dogs, chocolate ice cream and romantic movies. Oh, and her number-crunching husband.

I love it. Short, sassy, and to the point. I decided to ask each author the same set of questions so we could get a feel for each other’s quirks across the board. So…on to the interview!

LG: At what point did you decide to write Christian historical romance? In other words, what was your “a-ha!” moment?
LW: I knew that I wanted to write something both my grandmas and my daughters could read. For me, that mean inspirational romance so it would be clean but still have a lot of emotion. I have always loved reading inspy romance as well, so it was a natural fit for me.
LG: What “eras” are your favorite, and is there an era you haven’t written about that strikes your fancy?
LW: I love writing Westerns and I think it must’ve started when my dad read me and my siblings Louis L’Amour books during my childhood. I love the action and cowboys and how tough people had to be just to survive.
I love reading Regencies and have completed about a third of one before I wrote my second Western. I still like the story and may go back and finish it some day.
LG: If you could only read one author/book for the rest of your life, what would you choose?
LW: Oh, wow am I glad this is only hypothetical! There are too many good ones that I am addicted to. Probably Kim Vogel Sawyer. I love the romance and emotion and heroes in her books.
LG: What was the biggest stumbling block you had to overcome with your writing career?
LW: Getting past the sagging middle. When I was still learning the craft, I would get mid-way into a manuscript and be unable to finish. When I finally started learning how to develop full, well-rounded characters the middles got a lot easier for me. What do I still struggle with? Deadlines. It seems like the kids always get sick about a week before I have to turn something in.
LG: What is the biggest joy your career has brought you so far?
LW: “Meeting” new readers through emails and letters, and at in-person events. I love hearing that my writing has touched someone or just that they enjoyed it.
Roping the Wrangler (Love Inspired Historical Series)
And here’s a sneak peek at her newest release, Roping the Wrangler:

Teacher Seeks a Husband

Schoolmarm Sarah Hansen longs for a family of her own. But horse trainer Oscar White is the last man she’d consider. Still, she can’t help noticing the care he shows three motherless girls and the gentle way he helps Sarah overcome her fear of horses.

Too bossy by half—that’s the Sarah that Oscar remembers from their teenage years. Yet as a former orphan, he finds the little Caldwell sisters—and their pretty teacher—getting under his skin. Could the tender heart Sarah’s always hidden tame a once-reckless wrangler?

Remember, drop by to comment all week on these blogs and you will be entered to win the autographed bundle! Contest open to US residents only. Thank you!

An Interview with Bethany House Author Jen Turano

I have a funny story to tell you about Jen Turano. A few years ago, I had an agent and a manuscript (which eventually became Captain of Her Heart), but no publisher. And I was, according to my friends, a shoo-in for the Golden Heart, the writing award that the Romance Writers of America gives away every year–and which can launch the career of any obscure writer. Everyone was so sweet and so encouraging that I began to believe it myself.

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The author herself, Jen Turano.

On the day the contenders were announced, I didn’t receive a phone call. I wasn’t a shoo-in after all. In fact, I didn’t even warrant the competition. The small flame of hope in me died, and I had what every literary agent calls a “ledge moment,” where I seriously considered giving up writing altogether. So my agent at the time was also Jen Turano’s agent, and she introduced us by email. She seemed to have the intuition that Jen could laugh me out of my sorrow.

And she did. Jen’s emails became my lifeline during a tumultuous period of my writing career, and we became long distance writing pals. She encouraged me in everything I did. And when we were both under consideration by Bethany House, our friendship wasn’t strained. I wanted her to get signed–and she did. I was happy to play Deanna Durbin to her Judy Garland, because just a short time later I was signed by Love Inspired.

From agent buddies to writing buddies to signed at almost the same time buddies. And she’s helped me out of many a plot hole, too.

I have wanted to host Jen on my blog for some time, and the release of her newest book, A Most Peculiar Circumstance, seems like the ideal opportunity. So I decided to invite her for a rather writerly conversation about our books and our habits.
LG: What’s one thing your heroes have in common? I mean, as you know, mine have disabilities that, in some form or another, cannot be overcome. They can be triumphed over but won’t go away. Not sure why. I wanted to have heroes who were deeply flawed and not just “I am too rich and too good-looking.” You?

JT: I always find “flawed” gentlemen to be so much more interesting than that “perfect” man, because honestly, perfection tends to get a little boring after a while. While my heroes normally do managed to retain possession of all of their limbs, they’re all plagued with, er, well, personality challenges. Some are brooding, some grumpy, or others might just have the tendency to sulk, which I find rather delightful. Take my husband for instance. Don’t get me wrong, he’s a great guy, but there’s just something adorable about him when he’s a little grumpy – not that he ever owns up to that and if I have the audacity to actually point out the fact he’s a little surly, I always get that immediate denial, spoken in a somewhat grumpy tone of voice, and that always makes me laugh and have the distinct urge to hug him.

LG: So your hubby gets grumpy. What about you? Any nervous habits while writing? I bite my nails, so I have to get a gel manicure if I am going to make it through a manuscript.

JT: Hmm…nope, I can’t come up with any nervous habits, but if I’m in the midst of a first draft, I do get rather intense and heaven help the poor soul (normally my husband or son) who just happens to interrupt me with some mundane question like “When is dinner?” or “Do you want to go out for ice-cream?” I’ve been known to give an airy dismissal with a dainty flick of a wrist which normally earns me a good rolling of the eyes as footsteps stomp away from my office.

LG: You describe that so very well, my dear! I can just see the dainty flick of the wrist now. I bite my nails when I cannot come up with good names. How do you name your characters? I am totally boring on this and will usually just give up and go for the church registry of this little village in England for my names.

JT: I’ve never thought about going to a church registry before. Normally I scour the obituaries and look for odd names – the odder the better I always say, but I do look at old census data and then I found a wonderful site of Edwardian names on the web. I’m thinking I’m going to have to use Permilia sometime because that name is just too fabulous, but haven’t come up with a character yet to fit that particular name.

LG: OK, then, let’s talk about your future heroine, Permilia. What’s one thing she would never, ever do? (Apart from the restrictions of our genre, of course. ;))

JT: Well, it certainly is true we have some restrictions because of our genre, but I can’t see me ever writing a heroine who would go after another lady’s gentleman, even for a plot twist. That just leads to all sorts of trouble and I do like to write my heroines with a somewhat noble character.

LG: So you don’t adhere to Scarlett O’Hara’s worldview, that it’s a girl’s job to hang on to her man. Fair enough! So when you write about Permilia, will you include your favorite romantic trope? I must confess, I will always love the bluestocking who reforms a rake.

JT: Oh, I love the bluestocking, such an interesting character and one who can be written so many intriguing ways. I like writing independent, progressive ladies who just seem to always get themselves into mischief and do need saving by the hero, but who are also perfectly capable of saving themselves.

LG: OK, lightning round! Finish this sentence…If I couldn’t write I would…

JT: Stop talking to myself while out on walks and would probably revert to being somewhat normal.

LG: Where did you grow up?

JT: I grew up in the small town of St. Clairsville, Ohio, a place I absolutely adore and wouldn’t mind living in again someday.

LG: What made you decide to write–esp Inspirational Fiction? Mine is a long drawn out story but let’s just say for now that it was a calling.

JT: I relate to those “long drawn out story” scenarios. I didn’t start out writing romance, but middle-grade, then moved to YA, then contemporary fiction. When an agent called me and told me that she liked the contemporary fiction but that it was like four hundred pages too long, I almost gave up, coming to the belief I just wasn’t savvy enough to ever, as in ever, break into the publishing world. A friend came over to console me, and while having a great chat, she suggested I write one of those “Fabio” stories. Since I read historical romance more than any other genre, I decided to give it a go, and not too long after finishing that book, I had signed with an agent. We never did sell that particular book, but oddly enough, A Change of Fortune literally sprang to mind while I was cleaning the shower and one thing led to another. The next thing you know, I’m writing for Bethany House and enjoying every minute of it. Well, okay, sometimes I’m not enjoying every single minute, but you know what I mean. 😉

LG: OK, let’s delve into the stuff we don’t enjoy. What’s your least favorite thing about writing? I hate promotion…I’m just not good at it.

JT: Promotion is a tough one and I have to admit, I’m not that good at it either, but I think my least favorite thing about this writing gig is the reviews. Not the good reviews, I adore those, but every once in a while you get someone who makes their review personal, and I really don’t care for that at all. If someone doesn’t like my work, I’m fine with that – I read tons of books I don’t care for, but I’ve never slammed an author, and I truly do wish people would think before they hit that publish button. We authors are a tender lot and sometimes words do sting.

LG: I got a review one time that just said two words: “Too religious.” How is that fair? I mean, you are reading inspirational fiction, after all. Let’s end on a positive note. What’s your favorite thing about writing? Mine is getting to decide the ending.

JT: I love figuring out the ending, but I think my favorite thing has to just be getting to live in my imagination. I’ve always been a little odd in that regard, but since I’m now an author, people find me eccentric and interesting which is so much better than odd, or…peculiar.

Cover image shared by author.

Cover image shared by author.

And here’s all you need to know about Jen’s latest book, A Most Peculiar Circumstance:

Miss Arabella Beckett has one driving passion: to help the downtrodden women of America. Naturally, she supports the women’s suffrage movement and eagerly attends rallies and lectures across the country. On her travels, she makes a simple offer of assistance to a young woman in need that goes sadly awry and lands both ladies in more trouble than they can manage. An independent sort, Arabella is loath to admit she needs help and certainly doesn’t need help from an arrogant, narrow-minded knight in shining armor.

Mr. Theodore Wilder, private investigator extraordinaire, is on a mission. A mission that began as a favor to his good friend Hamilton Beckett, but swiftly evolved into a merry chase across the country. By the time he finally tracks down Hamilton’s sister, Arabella, he is in a less than pleasant mood. When the lady turns out to have radical ideas and a fiercely independent streak, he soon finds himself at his wit’s end.

When they return home to New York, circumstances force their paths to continue to cross, but the most peculiar feelings growing between them certainly can’t be love. When the trouble Arabella had accidentally stirred up seems to have followed her to New York and threatens her very life, the unlikely couple must face the possibility that they might have landed in the most peculiar circumstance of all: love.

Jen is very graciously giving away one copy of her book to a lucky commentor below. Be sure to add your email address! US residents only, please! Giveaway ends 7/19/13.

Writing Wednesday: Grace Livingston Hill and an Old Fashioned Christmas

Grace Livingston Hill is the grandmother of all of us inspirational romance authors. If you read or write inspirational fiction today, you owe Hill a tremendous debt. At the turn of the last century, when women were not always encouraged to work outside the home, a recently-widowed Hill was able to support herself and her child by writing stories that wove a message of faith together with delightful romance and dramatic suspense.

Her stories were like bread and butter to me growing up, and as I chronicled, led me to my path as an inspy romance writer. I have a few that will always be my favorites, but the one I want to talk about today is The Substitute Guest (1936). This is a Christmas story, and it was written in the middle of the Great Depression. We have a tendency nowadays to look back on this era and think, “Wow, they really knew how to celebrate Christmas back then,” but in Hill’s world, Christmas was a battle between crass materialism and meaning and faith even during the good old days.

Our hero, Alan Monteith, is headed to his girlfriend’s winter lodge to celebrate. But this celebration rings hollow:

There would be excitement and hilarity, there would be amusement and a wealth of unique variety. There would be luxury of eating and drinking and apparel, but it would not be Christmas, not real Christmas. (page 8)

Alan is waylaid on the way to his party when he attempts to do a good deed for a friend, and ends up snowbound with the Devereaux family, a mother and father and their two grown children. One of these children is Daryl, our heroine. She is fighting feelings of resentment and loss when her fiance blows her off for a drunken hotel party with his boss and coworkers. Alan is able to complete his errand with the help of the family, and ends up staying with them during the worst part of a blizzard.

During this blizzard, the Devereaux clan welcomes Alan as one of their own, and he gets the joy of celebrating a real, old-fashioned Christmas in the country.

There was a quiet sense of being shut in that gave security and a new kind of peace. He wasn’t going to feel badly if he had to stay the day out here among these delightful sincere people. He had a feeling as he woke that he was a little boy again waking on Christmas morning, with the thrill of anticipation that he used to feel as a child. It was great. He lay still for a little just to keep that delightful sense of expectancy. (page 141)

Sparks fly between Daryl and Alan as they realize how much they long for security and peace along with love. In order to embrace each other, they must cast aside all the worldly materialism that their respective lovers represent. And, as in any good inspirational story, the development of their faith is just as profound as the deepening of their love.

And no discussion of Hill’s books would be complete without mentioning the domestic coziness she weaves into every story. When I finish reading one of her books, I want to bake cookies, sew new curtains for the living room, and make a pretty flower arrangement in a pickle jar–all at the same time. Here’s a sweet passage from The Substitute Guest:

Simple breakfast, Mrs. Devereaux had said.

There was wonderful oatmeal, steamed all night until each grain stood out softly and separately, with Chrystobel’s cream to eat on it, cream almost as thick as the oatmeal. Eaten in old Haviland china saucers with springs of forget-me-not on them, and a silver spoon so old it was almost paper thin. Then there were hot rolls and doughnuts and coffee! Simple breakfast indeed! (page 153)

I always crave oatmeal after reading that passage. With cream, of course!

I have a battered old first edition of this book that I save every year to read throughout the season. It’s a warm and loving tale and if you haven’t read any of Hill’s books, first I must say shame on you, and then I must say “read this one!” It’s one of my favorite holiday traditions; in fact, I pack it away so I am not tempted to read it throughout the year.

What are your favorite Christmas stories? Tell me what stories you save up to read during the Christmas season, and I will enter you in a drawing to win one vintage copy of The Substitute Guest. Contest is open to US residents only; please include a valid email address when you comment. Contest ends December 1, 2012. I look forward to hearing about your favorite reads!